Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Transition Knuckle


Ok so here it is. You all know I'm not a "chopper" guy, but i do like to capture those bikes that bridge the bobber to chopper era. It seems to be the least recorded part of our sports history. The mid 50's to early 60's custom. This is a great example and one bitchin' ride!

9 comments:

LUCKY said...

so is it a chopper or a bobber? if its a chopper what makes it one the dog bones to the flanders bars?

Chris K said...

I was speechless when I first saw this bike.

The fact that bikes from the transition period are less known makes them that more fascinating.

I think the term chopper or bobber (bob job), meant less at that time than now. After all, they are both just terms for cutting.

Sidecar Roy said...

I don't think there's anything chopped about this bike, other than the seat. Would anyone else consider this a chopper at all? To me it would have to have a 21 up front and maybe some frame modification? I'm really into these transition bikes, more like what was rode around here in the midwest thru the sixties.

fouraces said...

note the Lamoreaux/Milne signs in the background. This is So Cal, this is probably Larry's Bike. Four Aces, Checkers?

Flathead Jedd said...

Ok here we go again. Wes and I have argued for hours about this subject. For starters let me say this and don't be offended if you are not from California. Out here style changes so quickly that it starts to blend together. The transition period out here was short. Due to popular biker movies filmed out here California styles were shared with the country and caught on a little later. You see this in car custom trends. Style develops quickly and fades just as quick. As for the chopper vs bobber, here are my thoughts on this bike. The risers and bars originally were race modifications to position the rider for racing. On this bike I believe they are for style (custom) The seat and p-pad vintage racing (bobber) the striped pattern (custom). The additional chrome ie hubcap, spring cups, etc (custom). I say custom because to me a chopper is a late 60's 70's long bike. Maybe not by the origin of the term, but in modern definition and common usage. As Dr Sprocket has pointed out to me (several times) bobber is a modern term and that style was never really called that, a "bob job" yes. Bobber, no. Much like the term "hot rod." Never was a complement in the day. So to tie it back together, here's what I think. Younger kids in the 50's saw the bikes that the older cool racers guys rode and emulated them. They took the styling cues from the race bikes without knowing the function. For example if risers and higher bars are on Johnny Racers bike and he's the coolest then I'll put higher risers and bars on and that will make me even cooler. Sometimes it did and sometimes it didn't. This is my theory anyway. This Knuckle incorporates the cool elements of a 40's race bike, but with more emphasis on the custom end, hence a "transition" bike. This is all just my opinion and you may think I'm full of shit. Well so be it. One thing I can say for sure is, "This bike is awesome and I want it in my garage!"

drsprocket said...

I'll only add this Jedd. Riser's of different heights came about to add adjustability to one's bars as the stock units came out of the top tree and didn't fit everyone. street or race.

drsprocket said...

Here's a little bit of history for Wes about that sign. Lammy used to live up here in Sac. He and the Milne brothers shop in Pasadena was around the corner and butted up next to the saw sharpening shop of the Bubeck brothers. One was the infamous Max bubeck of Indian fame. Dry lakes record holder and Greenhorn winner twice. Once on an Indian 4 no les.

Sidecar Roy said...

I'm glad this sparked up the debate, I've been wondering others opinions. I think the removal of fenders might have to do a lot with geography, ie; your guys weather lends itself to no front fender, while maybe less pavement (rural) and more northern latitudes necessitate full fenders. It's hard to find a bobbed front fender on a bike in a pic from my area (ky). Even Danny lyons shows a custom full front fender (though minimal) on late 60's bike (Outlaw Crossing 2cd st Bridge in Louisvile)? Maybe our muddy roads kept fenders on bikes longer than out west?

THanks for all the input!

stag party jackets said...

very neat bike indeed. knucklehead motor with dual pipes and my favorite, the oil canister! cool added air cleaner and looks like the tool box mount is missing. smooth tanks with the shifter. haha, all things everybody noticed... but i had to say something...:)

-billy