Monday, April 6, 2009

Trivia


Does anyone know what "Chino" wears around his neck in the Wild One?
The Chino Jerseys will be available very soon from NLAMC. Very soon.

8 comments:

Knuckle Buster said...

A "Church Key" as we called it...a Bottle opener.

drsprocket said...

Jedd, make mine an X-large. I've been looking for one for more years than I can count. Sort of like tree rings.

Flathead Jedd said...

Rich they run pretty big. A large fits like an XL, what size chest do you have? Jacket size?

Irish Rich said...

An exquisite 1 carat Leo Diamond, in a 14 carat yellow gold setting, and matching necklace from Kay Jewelers?

Flathead Jedd said...

Irish Rich hit it on the head...after all every kiss begins with K.

Grumbler said...

Old Navy had a sale on long sleeved t-shirts the other month. Wide stripes in black/red and green/gray only. Thin stripes in silver/black, silver/red, brown/orange and blue/black. Have never, ever seen the red/white jersey worn by Lee Marvin available *anywhere* and that includes googling it. Will keep checking back on that shirt.

Flathead Jedd said...

Actually from my understanding the Lee Marvin shirt was blue and yellow and was purchase by a club member (HA I think)and he wore it till it fell off. By the way we got the Chinos in and they look great. I'll be posting pictures on the NLAMC blog shortly. Keep in mind we can make them in any color.
Jedd

Grumbler said...

Flathead Jedd - you're correct.

Source: http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/the-essay-stars-in-stripes-1105547.html

The Breton T-shirt was a key strand in the nascent T-shirt culture. In the American version it was white, an article of clothing appropriated from US forces' attire. In the film The Wild One (1953), which was banned in Britain until 1968, it is Marlon Brando's white T-shirt with the cigarette packet rolled up in one sleeve which is now seen as iconic, but co-star Lee Marvin's character, wearing the striped Breton-style T-shirt, had its own emotive power at the time, and in many ways his was the darker character. Both Brando, who, incidentally, was close to Juliette Greco at this time, and Marvin play outsiders, rebels, who ride into town on their bikes, kicking up dust in the face of the establishment and conservative America in general. Producer Stanley Kramer had been inspired by an article in Harper's on the 1947 take-over of the town of Hollister by 4,000 bikers. As Yves Lavigne writes in Hell's Angels, "He saw the outlaw biker as America's last individualist, a motorised bohemian ... Kramer helped make outlaw bikers, epitomised in real life by the Hell's Angels, the symbol of rebellion for two generations."

Legendary biker Frank Sadilek, inspired by the film, drove to Hollywood to buy the blue-and-yellow striped, long-sleeved T-shirt that Marvin wore in the movie, and became president of the Hell's Angels San Francisco chapter from 1955 to 1962. His appearance, writes Lavigne, established the archetypal biker look: the gold earring, the clip-on nose ring, purple- dyed beard and that T-shirt which he would wear until it fell to pieces. A uniquely American variation on the striped T-shirt at this time, the prison uniform, also signified the outsider in the public's mind.